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Stay Safe, Stop the Spread

PRESS RELEASE

The Baker County Health Department reminds everyone to stay vigilant to the symptoms of COVID-19 and continue taking steps to stop the spread of the virus. Preventing the spread of COVID-19 is vital for a healthy community and a healthy economy.

In May, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention expanded its list of Coronavirus symptoms. A variety of symptoms have been reported, and the severity varies with each case. This list includes the most common symptoms; however, others have been reported. Please consult your medical provider for any symptoms that are severe or concerning to you. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus.

Symptoms:
● Fever
● Cough
● Difficulty breathing
● Chills
● Repeated shaking with chills
● Muscle pain
● Headache
● Sore Throat
● New loss of taste or smell

Symptoms that required immediate medical attention:
● Difficulty breathing
● Shortness of breath
● Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
● New confusion or inability to rouse
● Blue face or lips

If you are experiencing possible symptoms of COVID-19 and it is not an emergency:

  • Stay home and reduce contact with household members as much as possible.
  • Contact your primary physician by phone. They will give you instructions about how to limit exposure to others and let you know if you need to seek medical care.

Here are some simple ways to prevent the spread of COVID-19:

  • Limit social and recreational activities where social distancing cannot be maintained.
  • Stay at least 6 feet from others and use face coverings in public settings.
  • Cover your cough and sneeze with a tissue or cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve, rather than into your hands.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, mouth or face.
  • Clean your hands regularly and thoroughly with soap and water or use alcohol-based hand sanitizer if you can’t wash your hands.
  • If you’re sick, isolate yourself until 72 hours after both fever and cough have gone away without the use of fever-reducing medicine.

For more information:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Baker County Circuit Court Judge Ruling

PRESS RELEASE

Today, Baker County Circuit Court Judge Matthew Shirtcliff issued a ruling in favor of plaintiffs seeking relief from Governor Brown’s Executive Orders. The Oregonian provided a link to Judge Shirtcliff’s ruling.

Since the ruling was issued, Baker County has received a number of questions about what the Circuit Court decision means for businesses and other organizations. Baker County is seeking guidance from the County’s legal counsel, and will share information when it’s available, but does not have any specific guidance available at this time.

Governor Brown issued a statement saying, “Today’s ruling from the Baker County Circuit Court will be appealed to the Oregon Supreme Court within hours to keep my emergency orders in effect.”

Baker County Reopening Plan Approved

PRESS RELEASE

Governor Brown approved Baker County’s Reopening Plan today, allowing some of the restrictions enacted under Governor Brown’s Stay Home Save Lives Executive Order 20-12 to begin lifting on May 15. The updated Reopening Plan is available on the Baker County COVID-19 website, www.bakercountycovid19.com, along with reopening guidance for businesses from the Oregon Health Authority.

Commissioner Mark Bennett said, “Thank you to everyone who has worked so hard to keep our community safe and get to where county businesses can reopen their doors. We still have a long way to go before we can fully reopen. Please continue the efforts to protect our health and our business’ vitality, because our community depends on both.”

The state COVID-19 Resources for Oregonians website, www.coronavirus.oregon.gov, explains that Phase 1 of the Reopening Oregon Plan allows limited reopening, under specific safety guidelines, of restaurants and bars for sit-down service; personal care and services businesses, including barbers and salons; and in-person gatherings of up to 25 people. Counties must remain in Phase I and continue to meet the state criteria for at least 21 days before becoming eligible to advance to Phase II. If counties begin to see significant increases in COVID-19 cases or community spread, the Oregon Health Authority will work with local public health officials to evaluate what actions should be taken. Significant growth in COVID-19 spread could necessitate a county moving back from Phase I to a stay-home status. More details on Phases II and III are forthcoming.

In order to be approved to enter Phase 1, Baker County had to demonstrate that there have been fewer than 5 hospitalizations for COVID-19, medical providers and public health have sufficient COVID-19 testing capabilities and the ability to provide quick ‘contact tracing’ for anyone who tests positive for COVID-19, have established plans for isolating and quarantining new cases, have sufficient hospital capacity to handle a surge in cases, and have enough personal protective equipment for health care workers. Baker County was found to meet all of these criteria.

The Baker County Business Operations and Recovery group is reaching out to businesses to provide information, resources and assistance for owners preparing to reopen. The group has held conference calls with each business sector this week. Anyone who would like to be added to the mailing list can visit the business page at www.bakercountycovid19.com or call 541-523-0015.

As customers return to local businesses, many things may be different as businesses put precautions in place to reduce the chance for spread of the virus, such as asking customers to wear a face covering, sanitize their hands upon entering, and maintain 6 feet of spacing between patrons. County officials ask the community to remain patient through these changes in order to stay safe and stop the spread while supporting local businesses. Businesses and customers with questions are encouraged to contact Business Liaison Jeff Nelson at 541-523-0015.